Tag Archives: style

The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

After the success of Fantastic Mr Fox and Moonrise Kingdom, his most accessible and consequently finest films to date, Wes Anderson lets his imagination run wild like never before with The Grand Budapest Hotel; a whimsical fantasy adventure that sees the bohemian director further blur the boundary between mainstream and independent cinema. Continue reading The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

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Only God Forgives Review

Nicolas Winding Refn’s hotly anticipated follow up to his commercially successful Drive is anything but. The Danish filmmaker may envelope audiences within a similar hyper-stylised world of neon-noir, but where Drive remains grounded (comparatively at least) Only God Forgives is unmercifully excessive, extremely challenging and deeply disturbing. But, despite everything it does to distance the viewer, it remains strangely compelling. Continue reading Only God Forgives Review

A Field in England Review

A Field in England screenshot

Substance abuse

Ben Wheatley, the darling of low-budget British cinema, unleashes an ambitious surrealist arthouse project A Field in England. Constructed from the idea of an “assault on the audience” Wheatley sought to create a film that captures the experience of hallucinogenic drugs, but with its ambiguous imagery and convoluted narrative this pretentious trip leads the audience on a futile quest for meaning and entertainment.

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Moonrise Kingdom Review

Moonrise Kingdom screenshot

The good old days.

From its potent idiosyncrasy to its ceaseless, yet stylistically flexible humour Moonrise Kingdom is childlike, but in no way simpler or less serious than any of Wes Anderson’s previous films. In fact, it eclipses each of them with a mature expression of childhood complexities. Beneath the varying layers of peculiarity, eccentricity and comedy is a meaningful reflection of relationships, family and love.

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A History of Violence Review

Sometimes the past catches up with you, whether you want it to or not.

The film is brimming with brilliant performances, particularly from Viggo Mortensen and Maria Bello in their central roles, but the most impressive performance came from Ed Harris. He makes full use of his screen time and benefits from a well written script as the frighteningly sinister Carl Fogerty. Continue reading A History of Violence Review

Edward Scissorhands Review

 

Burton’s fairy tale is undoubtedly his best, but that’s not saying much.

From their shrill voices as they gossip and bitch to their conceited lifestyle of designer clothes, hairdos and commodities, Burton’s presentation of a suburban community is truly horrid. Each brightly coloured McMansion within his model village is a replica of the last, highlighting the one thing this society lacks – imagination. This is the foundation for his central theme; the director deconstructs commodification and exposes the falsity of the American dream. Continue reading Edward Scissorhands Review