Tag Archives: genre

A Good Day to Die Hard Review

A Good Day to Die Hard Screenshot

A bad day for Die Hard.

Six years ago Len Wiseman found relative success with his attempt at reviving the Die Hard franchise from its twelve year cinema absence. While an ambitious combination of old-school heroics and new-age sensibilities never quite works in Die Hard 4.0, there are at least the familiar high-octane action set pieces to appease the fans and make it a watchable, yet inferior addition to the franchise. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said for the fifth, erroneously titled venture, A Good Day to Die Hard.

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Silver Linings Playbook Review

Silver Linings Playbook Screenshot

Rewriting the romantic comedy playbook.

With a near two-decade long career of critically acclaimed, but quietly released films, David O. Russell was regrettably little known within the UK. That was until the American director created what many regard as his most significant film, The Fighter. The compelling character study embedded within that biographical sports drama gripped audiences and increased Russell’s audience and popularity. So, expectations were high for his follow up film, an adaptation of Matthew Quick’s novel Silver Linings Playbook.

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House at the End of the Street Review

House At The End Of The Street screenshot

Proof that you shouldn’t judge a film by its title

An influx of unimaginative titles have plagued modern cinema and the resulting releases carry a sense of negativity long before the house lights are even dimmed. These marketing misconceptions are frequently present within mainstream horror and unfortunately House at the End of the Street falls under this same shadow of audience’s preconceived aversion. However, much like The Cabin in the Woods, there’s a lot more to this film than the title suggests.

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Taken 2 Review

Taken 2 Screenshot

Once Upon a Time in “Istanbul”

Unlike other senior action headliners returning to the genre in an attempt to cash-in on their popularity and reputation, Liam Neeson made his debut in mainstream action cinema late on in his acting career. Pierre Morel’s 2008-hit Taken was the spark that ignited the, then fifty-six year old, actor’s remarkable rejuvenation that saw him subsequently star in at least eight action flicks. Four years since the original, Neeson returns to his role as retired CIA operative Bryan Mills for a predictable sequel, but in this case under the direction of the underwhelming, but brilliantly named Olivier Megaton.

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Django Unchained Review

Django Unchained Screenshot

“You had my curiosity. But now you have my attention.”

Quentin Tarantino follows the success of Inglorious Basterds with another outlandish historical revision, but instead of targeting the Second World War subgenre, the acclaimed director sets his sights on western mythology for his reimagining of the legendary Django. Amplifying the spaghetti western undertones that lingered throughout Inglorious Basterds, and free from the shackles of the original narrative, Tarantino delivers a powerfully wild, provocative and imaginative revisionist western.

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Sinister Review

Sinster Screenshot

The rules have changed. Didn’t you get the memo?

Early 2012 saw the release of The Cabin in the Woods, an exemplary analysis of modern horror films where its creators, Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon, exposed the popular genre’s contemporary conventions. This genre-changing film has had a lasting effect on mainstream audiences’ reception of horrors; they now expect innovation and a higher standard – and this is the undoing of Scott Derrickson’s Sinister.

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The Amazing Spider-Man Review

Telling the same story, but in a slightly different way.

The middle part of 2012 proved incredibly popular for the superhero genre as three monumental blockbusters dominated the summer releases. Whedon’s stunning culmination of Marvel’s most famous heroes in Avengers Assemble, the breathtaking conclusion to Nolan’s trilogy and even a new Spiderman film – each of these films, though focussed on different concepts, are all anchored to the same genre shift.

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