Tag Archives: Film

Send In The Clowns

Clowns (klaʊns)

  1. Comic performers who entertain with eccentric costumes, exaggerated features and/or various forms of physical humour.
  2. The single most evil and horrifying creatures of all-time. Ever.

It’s safe to say clowns are divisive, but regardless of where you stand on the entertaining/terrifying debate, there’s simply no denying their cultural significance. From their origins as court jesters to innocent, child-friendly entertainers, and eventually horror icons as sinister, child-eating movie monsters, clowns have remained a permanent fixture in cinema since it began. Continue reading Send In The Clowns

Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom Review

During the UK premiere of Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom, a week after its US debut, news broke of Nelson Mandela’s death and people across the world united to mourn the loss of one of history’s greatest heroes. In a moment of impossible timing, Justin Chadwick’s adaptation of the late anti-apartheid revolutionary’s autobiography was transformed from a biopic into a eulogy. And it succeeds in this new context as a sentimental obituary that reminds audiences of the man and his achievements, unfortunately it fails to offer any fresh information that even the most casual viewer won’t know on their way in. Continue reading Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom Review

The Master Review

The Master screenshot

“I am a writer, a doctor, a nuclear physicist and a theoretical philosopher. But above all, I am a man, a hopelessly inquisitive man, just like you.”

Paul Thomas Anderson’s filmmaking career has been built from a yearning to innovate and astonish and though his profound cinematic presentations of life are some of the film industry’s finest, it’s his flawless consistency that’s truly remarkable. His success with such a unique style and ability to surpass even his own high expectations has warranted recognition as a modern day auteur. Five years on from There Will Be Blood, the great director returns with his most unique venture, but like all of his perfectionist creations, The Master is psychologically absorbing, yet strikingly cinematic and emotionally engaging.

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The 10 Most Misleading Film Titles of All Time

misleading movie titles

Many consider a film’s title to be unimportant, trivial even, but the name has long been a key factor in a film’s success. In contemporary cinema the role of the marketer is as pivotal as ever and the title process is increasingly fundamental in a period where a movie’s name can be the difference between a hit and a flop.

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Side By Side Review

Side By Side Screenshot

“No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls” – Ingmar Bergman

Film or digital? A question that’s been hotly debated within filmic circles ever since George Lucas declared the original celluloid format was dead back in 2002. This decade of discussion compelled enthusiastic writer director Christopher Kenneally to create a documentary that investigates the histories, creative processes and relevance of each format while also presenting the polarizing opinions from both camps, side by side.

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Brave Review

Brave Screenshot

Pixar’s attempts of redemption following the shameful Cars 2.

Ever since Pixar broke ground in 1995, with the innovative and universally acclaimed Toy Story, audiences have expected the same quality in each of their follow up films. Until recently the prestigious animation studio conquered the immense expectation and delivered consistently brilliant cinema experiences that reinvigorated the animation film. After hitting their first speed bump in 2011 with the disappointing sequel for Cars, Pixar attempts to refine their aim and hit the target with fantasy adventure Brave.

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