Tag Archives: fantasy

The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

After the success of Fantastic Mr Fox and Moonrise Kingdom, his most accessible and consequently finest films to date, Wes Anderson lets his imagination run wild like never before with The Grand Budapest Hotel; a whimsical fantasy adventure that sees the bohemian director further blur the boundary between mainstream and independent cinema. Continue reading The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

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The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Review

smaug screen

Almost a year ago exactly, Peter Jackson’s An Unexpected Journey opened to great financial success, but disappointed critically as many viewers failed to indulge in its epic length, the often trivial plot embellishments and frankly pointless high frame rate experimentation. Restrained by the trepidation that these failures provoked, The Desolation of Smaug failed to repeat its predecessor’s box-office triumph, but this gutsy sequel returns Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy to familiar ground – a bigger, bolder adventure with detailed characters and breathtaking action set pieces.

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Mama Review

Mama screenshot

Mama, ooo-ooo

Argentinian filmmaker Andrés Muschietti makes his directorial debut with a feature length reworking of his original short film. Unfortunately, his efforts result in a flawed experience that is a long way short of a classic piece of horror filmmaking, but as a thriller it is absolutely watchable.

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Oz The Great and Powerful Review

Oz the Great and Powerful screenshot

There’s no place like home.

After his lacklustre 2009 horror Drag Me To Hell, Sam Raimi returns to the director’s chair with a rather foolhardy attempt at modernising a beloved classic. Sadly, the result is a film lacking in intelligence, courage and heart.

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Moonrise Kingdom Review

Moonrise Kingdom screenshot

The good old days.

From its potent idiosyncrasy to its ceaseless, yet stylistically flexible humour Moonrise Kingdom is childlike, but in no way simpler or less serious than any of Wes Anderson’s previous films. In fact, it eclipses each of them with a mature expression of childhood complexities. Beneath the varying layers of peculiarity, eccentricity and comedy is a meaningful reflection of relationships, family and love.

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