Tag Archives: documentary

Sky Atlantic Documentary Films: Season 2

Following its successful debut, Sky’s celebrated Documentary Films, which launched in November, returns with four more documentaries from award-winning filmmakers for a second season. For No Good Reason, The Unknown Known, Blood Brother and Small Town Big Story (aka Jesus Town, USA) each received their UK premieres on Sky Atlantic this June. Here’s a breakdown of what you missed: Continue reading Sky Atlantic Documentary Films: Season 2

Blackfish Review

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Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s informative and thought provoking documentary offers a comprehensive introduction to the captivity of killer whales, their trainers and the human tragedies that have made a business like SeaWorld increasingly controversial.

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The Act of Killing Review

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“I have not seen a film as powerful, surreal, and frightening in at least a decade” – Werner Herzog

Regardless of how many films you watch, The Act of Killing is unlike anything you’ve seen before. Joshua Oppenheimer, Christine Cynn and a third collaborator, who like the majority of the crew remain anonymous for their own safety, unite as a directorial trio to deliver a challenging and outrageously innovative documentary about the Indonesian genocide in 1965.

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The Crash Reel Review

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Compelling, flawed and tricky. tricky. tricky.

With incredible access to Kevin Pearce, his family and friends and their archive footage of his brief extreme sports career, Lucy Walker has assembled a compelling documentary about the teenage snowboarding champion and potential Olympian, who suffered a traumatic brain injury after a serious crash during training in 2009.

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McCullin Review

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 “I talk as if there’s a lot of poetry in me, there isn’t. I am neither an artist nor a poet. I’m a photographer.”

Legendary British photojournalist Don McCullin worked for The Sunday Times from 1966 to 1983 and over the course of his career he risked his life to cover wars and humanitarian disasters across the globe. Sibling documentary filmmakers Jacqui and David Morris direct their exclusive and engrossing portrait of McCullin’s illustrious career and reveal the man behind the photographs that brought home the horrors of war.

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Searching for Sugar Man Review

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“He had this kind of magical quality that all the genuine poets and artists have: to elevate things. To get above the mundane, the prosaic. All the bullshit. All the mediocrity that’s everywhere. The artist, the artist is the pioneer.”

A touching documentary that tells the remarkable, if a little sensationalised story of Sixto Rodriguez; a talented, influential sixties musician who disappeared after his records failed to sell and his label dropped him. Continue reading Searching for Sugar Man Review

Side By Side Review

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“No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls” – Ingmar Bergman

Film or digital? A question that’s been hotly debated within filmic circles ever since George Lucas declared the original celluloid format was dead back in 2002. This decade of discussion compelled enthusiastic writer director Christopher Kenneally to create a documentary that investigates the histories, creative processes and relevance of each format while also presenting the polarizing opinions from both camps, side by side.

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The Imposter Review

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A story so bizarre, its hard to believe its true.

British director Bart Layton makes an astonishing entrance into cinema with his feature debut, The Imposter, a ninety-minute documentary that tells the remarkable story of French conman Frédéric Bourdin. Three years after thirteen-year old Nicholas Barclay disappeared from the Texas suburbs in 1994, his family receive a phone call from Spanish officials claiming that they have found the missing child. However, the child is in fact twenty-three year old Bourdin who hopes to deceive Nicholas’ family, US embassy officials and FBI agents and gain entry to the United States – but that’s only the tip of the iceberg for this bizarre tale.

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Room 237 Review

“I would not think of quarrelling with your interpretation nor offering any other, as I have found it always the best policy to allow the film to speak for itself.” – Stanley Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick’s legendary adaptation of Stephen King’s horror The Shining may be over thirty years old, but due to the director’s fastidious approach his films are subject to eternal debate, speculation and mystery. Rodney Ascher’s documentary explores the numerous theories about the hidden meanings within Kubrick’s visionary masterpiece.

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