Tag Archives: Cinema

The Imposter Review

The Imposter Screenshot

A story so bizarre, its hard to believe its true.

British director Bart Layton makes an astonishing entrance into cinema with his feature debut, The Imposter, a ninety-minute documentary that tells the remarkable story of French conman Frédéric Bourdin. Three years after thirteen-year old Nicholas Barclay disappeared from the Texas suburbs in 1994, his family receive a phone call from Spanish officials claiming that they have found the missing child. However, the child is in fact twenty-three year old Bourdin who hopes to deceive Nicholas’ family, US embassy officials and FBI agents and gain entry to the United States – but that’s only the tip of the iceberg for this bizarre tale.

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Thirteen Films for ’13

2013 Films Feature

As another year draws to a close, we can reflect on 2012 and recognise it as a fantastic year for film, with audiences supporting cinemas in terrific numbers. The staggering box-office success of Avengers Assemble, Skyfall and Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part II has laid the foundations for a revival of the cinema industry. To follow a year as saga-concluding, record-breaking and Bond-resurrecting as 2012 will be a tough task, but 2013 is abundant with enticing films capable of doing so. 2013 is a year of returning franchise pieces (The Hangover Part III, Fast and Furious 6 and Paranormal Activity 5), Hollywood remakes (Oldboy, Evil Dead and Carrie) and 3D re-releases (Monsters Inc, Jurassic Park and Independence Day). Here are my thirteen most anticipated films for the fast approaching ’13.

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Tyrannosaur Review

A depressing definition of the term misnomer.

The breathtaking performances from Peter Mullan and Olivia Colman make Paddy Considine’s debut feature exceptional. Their conflicting characters’ intertwining arcs are entertaining, moving, but devastating. Therein lies the problem with Tyrannosaur – it’s so hard to watch and even harder to enjoy. Continue reading Tyrannosaur Review

The Amazing Spider-Man Review

Telling the same story, but in a slightly different way.

The middle part of 2012 proved incredibly popular for the superhero genre as three monumental blockbusters dominated the summer releases. Whedon’s stunning culmination of Marvel’s most famous heroes in Avengers Assemble, the breathtaking conclusion to Nolan’s trilogy and even a new Spiderman film – each of these films, though focussed on different concepts, are all anchored to the same genre shift.

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Lawless Review

“I’m a Bondurant. We don’t lay down for nobody”.

Much like his famed western, The Proposition, Hillcoat’s latest film displaces the conventional setting of the genre. While his previous film presented Australian history with the genre codes of the traditional western, Lawless occurs decades after the typical western setting, but once again indirectly, but deliberately criticises America’s past. Continue reading Lawless Review

Easy Rider Review

Get your motor runnin’, head out on the highway

Written and directed by its stars, Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper respectively, this iconic piece of counterculture lit the touch paper for a generation of New Hollywood cinema. While it may lack the contextual impact of its release, Easy Rider’s cultural and historical significance, as well as its quality, grants it a legendary status. Continue reading Easy Rider Review

The Artist Review

The Artist

Silence is golden

With its silent approach, black and white aesthetic and reduced aspect ratio, The Artist is a beautiful celebration of cinema’s golden era. Steeped in sentiment, the film’s musical accompaniment harks back to the early cinematic experience as well as expertly anchoring fantastic performances and an astutely self referential narrative. While the meaning behind each scene is explained by title cards, in keeping with the genre, the director and actors revive a higher calibre of acting which faded after the arrival of the talkies and is mostly lost to contemporary cinema. This is a film that doesn’t require dialogue; characters’ thoughts and emotions are shown purely through facial expressions and physical action. Continue reading The Artist Review