Tag Archives: British

Godzilla Review

Sixteen years have passed since the last major Godzilla film and though Roland Emmerich’s embarrassing 1998 effort has been disowned by Toho, the famous Japanese production company, it still looms over the once prolific franchise. There have only been two lackluster Japanese-made releases to satisfy fans in the meantime, but after a recent resurgence in monster movies Toho and their legendary monster make their Hollywood return. Continue reading Godzilla Review

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Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom Review

During the UK premiere of Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom, a week after its US debut, news broke of Nelson Mandela’s death and people across the world united to mourn the loss of one of history’s greatest heroes. In a moment of impossible timing, Justin Chadwick’s adaptation of the late anti-apartheid revolutionary’s autobiography was transformed from a biopic into a eulogy. And it succeeds in this new context as a sentimental obituary that reminds audiences of the man and his achievements, unfortunately it fails to offer any fresh information that even the most casual viewer won’t know on their way in. Continue reading Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom Review

A Field in England Review

A Field in England screenshot

Substance abuse

Ben Wheatley, the darling of low-budget British cinema, unleashes an ambitious surrealist arthouse project A Field in England. Constructed from the idea of an “assault on the audience” Wheatley sought to create a film that captures the experience of hallucinogenic drugs, but with its ambiguous imagery and convoluted narrative this pretentious trip leads the audience on a futile quest for meaning and entertainment.

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Les Misérables Review

les mis screenshot

Tom Hooper prepares another speech

Following the success of his Oscar-winning royal period drama The King’s Speech, British director Tom Hooper tackles an adaptation of Victor Hugo’s acclaimed Les Misérables. There have been many incarnations of the legendary 1862 French novel that date back to the birth of cinema, but Hooper is the first filmmaker to translate Alain Boublil’s and Claude-Michel Schönberg’s  musical stage play to the big screen.

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We Need To Talk About Kevin Review

We Need To Talk About Kevin Screenshot

Lynne Ramsay’s long awaited cinematic return

There’s a lot going on within Lynne Ramsay’s magnificently harrowing adaptation of Lionel Shriver’s 2003 novel, of the same name, but We Need To Talk About Kevin remains perfectly handled throughout. No shot is wasted within this remarkable film and every moment builds to the central exploration of a dysfunctional mother/son relationship.

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The Imposter Review

The Imposter Screenshot

A story so bizarre, its hard to believe its true.

British director Bart Layton makes an astonishing entrance into cinema with his feature debut, The Imposter, a ninety-minute documentary that tells the remarkable story of French conman Frédéric Bourdin. Three years after thirteen-year old Nicholas Barclay disappeared from the Texas suburbs in 1994, his family receive a phone call from Spanish officials claiming that they have found the missing child. However, the child is in fact twenty-three year old Bourdin who hopes to deceive Nicholas’ family, US embassy officials and FBI agents and gain entry to the United States – but that’s only the tip of the iceberg for this bizarre tale.

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Tyrannosaur Review

A depressing definition of the term misnomer.

The breathtaking performances from Peter Mullan and Olivia Colman make Paddy Considine’s debut feature exceptional. Their conflicting characters’ intertwining arcs are entertaining, moving, but devastating. Therein lies the problem with Tyrannosaur – it’s so hard to watch and even harder to enjoy. Continue reading Tyrannosaur Review