Sky Atlantic Documentary Films: Season 2

Following its successful debut, Sky’s celebrated Documentary Films, which launched in November, returns with four more documentaries from award-winning filmmakers for a second season. For No Good Reason, The Unknown Known, Blood Brother and Small Town Big Story (aka Jesus Town, USA) each received their UK premieres on Sky Atlantic this June. Here’s a breakdown of what you missed: Continue reading Sky Atlantic Documentary Films: Season 2

Godzilla Review

Sixteen years have passed since the last major Godzilla film and though Roland Emmerich’s embarrassing 1998 effort has been disowned by Toho, the famous Japanese production company, it still looms over the once prolific franchise. There have only been two lackluster Japanese-made releases to satisfy fans in the meantime, but after a recent resurgence in monster movies Toho and their legendary monster make their Hollywood return. Continue reading Godzilla Review

Noah Review

Four years after Black Swan, Darren Aronofsky returns with a film billed as a biblical epic, but is really anything but. Don’t expect a religious sermon as the visionary filmmaker transforms the widely known Old Testament story into another provocative, esoteric addition to a divisive, but no less fascinating filmography. Continue reading Noah Review

Need For Speed Review

Until recently, The Fast & Furious films were the closest thing to a big screen adaptation of EA’s popular racing simulator and after becoming one of Hollywood’s biggest franchises it was only a matter of time before someone caught on. Having secured the naming rights DreamWorks developed an official movie tie in to share a claim of its illegitimate counterpart’s spoils and while the Need For Speed name has proven enough to earn a quick buck, the film is neither fast nor furious enough to stand out from the crowd. Continue reading Need For Speed Review

The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

After the success of Fantastic Mr Fox and Moonrise Kingdom, his most accessible and consequently finest films to date, Wes Anderson lets his imagination run wild like never before with The Grand Budapest Hotel; a whimsical fantasy adventure that sees the bohemian director further blur the boundary between mainstream and independent cinema. Continue reading The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

12 Years A Slave Review

Adapted from Solomon Northup’s 1853 memoirs of the same name, 12 Years A Slave recounts his harrowing true story as a free man who is abducted and sold into slavery. He leads a pleasant life in New York with his family and it promises to be even better when he’s offered a lucrative job as a musician, but when Solomon wakes up in chains, his dark journey begins and Steve McQueen’s film never stops for breath. Continue reading 12 Years A Slave Review

The Lego Movie Review

Despite twenty years of technical progress and the influx of competitors it spawned, Toy Story remains, to most film lovers, the finest and most visually innovative children’s film of all time. So, for directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller to borrow freely from such an ageless and beloved classic, yet ensure The Lego Movie remains universally appealing is a testament to the way this existing material is handled. It may not be wholly original, but nor is it derivative and this rip-roaring homage is imbued with enough freshness of its own to offer an experience like no other. This is Toy Story for a new generation; a cinematic event expertly crafted to attract and inspire film lovers new and old. Continue reading The Lego Movie Review

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