Category Archives: 2012

Moonrise Kingdom Review

Moonrise Kingdom screenshot

The good old days.

From its potent idiosyncrasy to its ceaseless, yet stylistically flexible humour Moonrise Kingdom is childlike, but in no way simpler or less serious than any of Wes Anderson’s previous films. In fact, it eclipses each of them with a mature expression of childhood complexities. Beneath the varying layers of peculiarity, eccentricity and comedy is a meaningful reflection of relationships, family and love.

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Seeking a Friend for the End of the World Review

SAFFTEOTW Screenshot

Hopefully it won’t leave you craving the end of the world.

Budding screenwriter Lorene Scafaria makes her directorial debut with the intriguing comedy drama Seeking a Friend for the End of the World. What’s immediately impressive about Scafaria’s films is the way in which she approaches the disaster movie subgenre. Rather than being obsessed with explosions, astronauts or superheroes, Scafaria is refreshing by crafting her narrative around a considered presentation of how ordinary people react to extraordinary situations.

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Killing Them Softly Review

Killing Them Softly Screenshot

“I like to kill them softly, from a distance. Not close enough for feelings”

Andrew Dominik’s third feature film Killing Them Softly is a loose adaptation of George V Higgins’ 1974 novel Cogan’s Trade and follows enforcer Jackie Cogan who is hired to restore order after a robbery at a mob-protected card game causes the local criminal economy to collapse. For his neo-noir crime thriller Dominik reunites with Brad Pitt and frees himself from the shackles of popular cinema convention to deliver a visceral piece of Americana.

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Silver Linings Playbook Review

Silver Linings Playbook Screenshot

Rewriting the romantic comedy playbook.

With a near two-decade long career of critically acclaimed, but quietly released films, David O. Russell was regrettably little known within the UK. That was until the American director created what many regard as his most significant film, The Fighter. The compelling character study embedded within that biographical sports drama gripped audiences and increased Russell’s audience and popularity. So, expectations were high for his follow up film, an adaptation of Matthew Quick’s novel Silver Linings Playbook.

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House at the End of the Street Review

House At The End Of The Street screenshot

Proof that you shouldn’t judge a film by its title

An influx of unimaginative titles have plagued modern cinema and the resulting releases carry a sense of negativity long before the house lights are even dimmed. These marketing misconceptions are frequently present within mainstream horror and unfortunately House at the End of the Street falls under this same shadow of audience’s preconceived aversion. However, much like The Cabin in the Woods, there’s a lot more to this film than the title suggests.

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Taken 2 Review

Taken 2 Screenshot

Once Upon a Time in “Istanbul”

Unlike other senior action headliners returning to the genre in an attempt to cash-in on their popularity and reputation, Liam Neeson made his debut in mainstream action cinema late on in his acting career. Pierre Morel’s 2008-hit Taken was the spark that ignited the, then fifty-six year old, actor’s remarkable rejuvenation that saw him subsequently star in at least eight action flicks. Four years since the original, Neeson returns to his role as retired CIA operative Bryan Mills for a predictable sequel, but in this case under the direction of the underwhelming, but brilliantly named Olivier Megaton.

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The Pirates! In an Adventure With Scientists Review

The Pirates Screenshot

Pirates of the Clay-animation

Aardman are second only to Pixar as the studio who audiences trust to bring them consistently entertaining and inventive big-screen animations. With such tremendous reputation it’s only natural that every new project is met with heightened expectations and they usually deliver. However, following consecutive disappointments, Flushed Away and Arthur Christmas, Aardman’s fifth feature film received a surprising amount of trepidation.

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